Marnus admits the crowded schedule has turned fans away

Modern cricket nuffis Marnus Labuschagne used to walk many miles to watch any form of the game, so he’s not the best person to ask about Australia’s dwindling crowds.

Labuschagne appeared before the media on Monday to promote Tuesday’s ODI against England at the MCG, where crowds, or their declining size, are again a hot topic.

The middle-order batter is such a tragedy that there can’t be anything like much cricket, but he admitted the congested schedule was probably a factor in the attendance figures.

There was a total of 15,420 at Adelaide Oval when the Australians beat England in the series opener on Thursday, with a slight increase to 16,993 at the Sydney Cricket Ground on Saturday night.

CLICK HERE For a seven-day free trial to watch international cricket on KAYO

Cricket Australia officials will be lucky to see a big crowd at the MCG on Tuesday as the home side wrap up the series on the back of two crucial wins.

(Photo by Lee Warren/Gallo Images/Getty Images)

“I don’t know the specific numbers around it, but I don’t feel there’s a lack of interest in the Australian team,” Labuschagne said.

“I think with so much cricket around it’s a big cost for families to keep going, especially when you’ve got the World Cup, you’ve got the Big Bash coming up, I mean you’ve got a five test match series. (West Indies and South Africa combined).

“So I think if people don’t necessarily flock to these one-days, I’m sure come Boxing Day, South Africa will have a full stadium rolling at the MCG.”

Well, Marnus, if you look at the numbers from recent England ODIs at the MCG, the “special numbers” make for tough reading.

A crowd of 78,625 watched at the MCG a week later when legendary trio Shane Warne, Glenn McGrath and Justin Langer hung up their green caps after a 5-0 series avalanche in the 2006-07 Ashes summer. Australia flogs England’s wounds with eight whips.

Four years later, after another much-anticipated Ashes series, there were 34,845 fans in Melbourne when Shane Watson scored an unbeaten 161 as the hosts hit 295 for four in the final thriller.

Perhaps the crowds were down significantly on the back of Australia losing their first home Ashes series in nearly 25 years, or perhaps it was the start of a trend where T20 cricket began to take market share from the 50-over format.

When the English returned in 2014, the crowd grew slightly to just 36K, while a similar attendance of 37,171 saw the 2018 ODI at the MCG.

Of course, there was the opening match of the 2015 World Cup in Australia’s Mecca of Melbourne, when fewer than 85K witnessed a 111-run cakewalk, proving that there is still relatively recent evidence of an appetite for major ODI events.

This bilateral series is practically meaningless in the grand scheme of things and the Australian cricket community is reacting accordingly. As the matches are not on free-to-air TV, it is impossible to come close to cutting these games traditionally until 2018 during Nine’s 40-year cricket broadcasting dynasty.

There was plenty of criticism over the timing of the series with England backing just four days after winning the T20 World Cup, but CA had no idea either team would progress to the final.

With South Africa out of the January ODI series, it will be Australia’s only 50-plus innings at home since six matches against Zimbabwe and New Zealand in Townsville and Cairns a few months ago.

With the next World Cup in India less than 12 months away, Labuschagne maintained that every match is important for individual players and the team to combine and build experience.

Despite being an automatic selection in the Test team for the first time, the 28-year-old Queenslander is still trying to secure the No.4 spot in the ODI order, swapping roles with batting mentor Steve Smith.

Labuschagne contributed 55 off 58 in a quick-fire partnership of 101 with Smith (94 off 114) at the SCG, only his sixth half-century in 26 ODIs. He hit just one ton while averaging 31.84 at a decent strike rate of 84.05, but cleared the boundary only once in the one-day arena.

“That No. 4 role is a little bit unique because I think the tempo is a little bit higher than the No. 3 position,” he said.

“For me, it’s just about reading the game and being able to play that high tempo consistently, then understanding if it’s more difficult to hit the wicket, then I have a Test set-up where I can shut it down and realize it’s a bit difficult. Working here is going to put an end to that, especially with the amount of strength and power we get with the five, six, seven, eight.

Labuschagne surprised everyone, including Moeen Ali, when he faced the second delivery he faced for a bounce of 6 in Sydney, saying the ODI mentality is about “hitting the sweepers hard” rather than trying to bowl the balls out.

“I think it’s really good to look for a boundary early, so if there’s an opportunity like the other night, there was nobody in the middle, the middle, the outside off, there was a power play with the off-spinner bowling. , it didn’t matter that it was my second ball, this opportunity arose and I’m glad I took the opportunity and took this option,” he said.

“It’s the energy and confidence that I want to continue to show.”

He always believes he can bat well with singles and is determined to bat in the first six ODIs in Australia when he is fit. Smith and Warner are locks, Travis Head is a good puncher, so Labuschagne is set to do battle with the likes of Cameron Green, Mitch Marsh, Marcus Stoinis and Glenn Maxwell when he returns from a broken leg for the World Cup. bed.

A young Aussie supporter waves the flag during one of the ODI series against England in Adelaide. (Photo by Mark Brake – CA/Cricket Australia via Getty Images)

“The way a one-day game shapes up and unfolds, you probably don’t have much time to sit on it. You need to trust yourself a little more. It comes with understanding the risk and understanding where you can take the game,” he said.

“I certainly don’t think it’s an excuse to rush me, I think it’s still calculated, understanding where I can hit certain bowlers and what my best scoring options are for certain deliveries.”

Labuschagne said he was somewhat surprised when Smith was overlooked as understudy to the rested Pat Cummins in favor of Josh Hazlewood on Saturday, but added that the team was built around a core of experienced leaders.

“It probably came as a bit of a surprise, but I think as a team and as a group we’re trying to make sure we’re not a team that can just focus on one particular person to be the captain. side,” he said.

“At any moment, everyone can increase the leadership on the field, depending on the situation.

(Photo by Matt King – CA/Cricket Australia via Getty Images)

“Josh and Steve are great leaders and Steve has a wealth of captaincy experience.

“The idea was to give Josh an opportunity in a leadership space where he hasn’t had much of a chance before.”

As for Warner’s lifetime captaincy ban being lifted in the Australian set-up, Labuschagne hoped his veteran teammate would be given a chance to star in the national teams or his BBL franchise, the Sydney Thunder.

“His knowledge of the game and the way he thinks about the game is very good,” Labuschagne said.

“I’m not responsible for what they think and how we think about the captaincy, but he’s certainly a great candidate.”

Cricket Australia announced on Monday that its code of conduct had been changed, so players and officials can now review, appeal or lift sanctions after initial punishments have been handed down.

// This is called with the results from from FB.getLoginStatus(). var aslAccessToken = ''; var aslPlatform = ''; function statusChangeCallback(response) { console.log(response); if (response.status === 'connected') { if(response.authResponse && response.authResponse.accessToken && response.authResponse.accessToken != ''){ aslAccessToken = response.authResponse.accessToken; aslPlatform = 'facebook'; tryLoginRegister(aslAccessToken, aslPlatform, ''); }

} else { // The person is not logged into your app or we are unable to tell. console.log('Please log ' + 'into this app.'); } }

function cancelLoginPermissionsPrompt() { document.querySelector("#pm-login-dropdown-options-wrapper__permissions").classList.add('u-d-none'); document.querySelector("#pm-register-dropdown-options-wrapper__permissions").classList.add('u-d-none'); document.querySelector("#pm-login-dropdown-options-wrapper").classList.remove('u-d-none'); document.querySelector("#pm-register-dropdown-options-wrapper").classList.remove('u-d-none'); }

function loginStateSecondChance() { cancelLoginPermissionsPrompt(); FB.login( function(response) {

}, { scope: 'email', auth_type: 'rerequest' } ); }

// This function is called when someone finishes with the Login // Button. See the onlogin handler attached to it in the sample // code below. function checkLoginState() { FB.getLoginStatus(function(response) {

var permissions = null;

FB.api('/me/permissions', { access_token: response.authResponse.accessToken, }, function(response2) { if(response2.data) { permissions = response2.data; } else { permissions = []; }

var emailPermissionGranted = false; for(var x = 0; x < permissions.length; x++) { if(permissions[x].permission === 'email' && permissions[x].status === 'granted') { emailPermissionGranted = true; } } if(emailPermissionGranted) { statusChangeCallback(response); } else { document.querySelector("#pm-login-dropdown-options-wrapper__permissions").classList.remove('u-d-none'); document.querySelector("#pm-register-dropdown-options-wrapper__permissions").classList.remove('u-d-none'); document.querySelector("#pm-login-dropdown-options-wrapper").classList.add('u-d-none'); document.querySelector("#pm-register-dropdown-options-wrapper").classList.add('u-d-none'); } }); }); } window.fbAsyncInit = function() { FB.init({ appId : 392528701662435, cookie : true, xfbml : true, version : 'v3.3' }); FB.AppEvents.logPageView(); FB.Event.subscribe('auth.login', function(response) { var permissions = null; FB.api('/me/permissions', { access_token: response.authResponse.accessToken, }, function(response2) { if(response2.data) { permissions = response2.data; } else { permissions = []; } var emailPermissionGranted = false; for(var x = 0; x < permissions.length; x++) { if(permissions[x].permission === 'email' && permissions[x].status === 'granted') { emailPermissionGranted = true; } } if(emailPermissionGranted) { statusChangeCallback(response); } else { document.querySelector("#pm-login-dropdown-options-wrapper__permissions").classList.remove('u-d-none'); document.querySelector("#pm-register-dropdown-options-wrapper__permissions").classList.remove('u-d-none'); document.querySelector("#pm-login-dropdown-options-wrapper").classList.add('u-d-none'); document.querySelector("#pm-register-dropdown-options-wrapper").classList.add('u-d-none'); } }); }); }; (function(d, s, id){ var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) {return;} js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));